Benjamin
Charity

Published:

Rewriting the Tech Stack: Transitioning from Angular 12 and GatsbyJS to Remix

Reading time: 8min

In addition to the technical details of the transition, I also want to share some of the challenges and benefits of using Remix. With Remix, I found it easier to manage my content and present it in a more organized and visually appealing way. The platform also allowed me to integrate various tools and services that improve user experience and streamline development. One of the most exciting features of Remix is its support for server-side rendering, which significantly enhances the website's performance and SEO.

A 16x9 neo-brutalist image showcasing a scale with a snail on one side and a leopard in a snail shell on the other. Predominantly black and white, with pops of color highlighting key elements. The background features abstract geometric shapes, enhancing the minimalist, modern design.
A 16x9 neo-brutalist image showcasing a scale with a snail on one side and a leopard in a snail shell on the other. Predominantly black and white, with pops of color highlighting key elements. The background features abstract geometric shapes, enhancing the minimalist, modern design.

With all these advantages, my website is now better positioned to serve its intended audience. So, without further ado, let's dive into the details of how I made the switch and what I learned along the way.

Choosing Remix for SSR and BFF Solutions

While deciding which framework to use for my website, I found server-side rendering (SSR) a crucial feature. It significantly improves website load times and overall performance, especially for content-heavy websites. After thorough research, I found that Remix's inherent SSR design makes it the perfect choice for my needs.

I have found the need for a dedicated backend for the front end (BFF) in multiple projects. What drew me towards Remix was its capability to simplify the creation of specific client APIs and optimize other front-end elements. With its ability to handle server-side rendering (SSR) and provide a flexible BFF framework, I realized that Remix was a choice and a strategic solution for my website.

The Shift to Vite

As a web developer, I fully comprehend performance's crucial role in achieving success while building tools. That's why I was impressed with Vite. Its reputation for being fast was not just empty talk; I experienced it, and it was genuinely unique.

Over the years, I have used various build tools, but using Vite felt like a breath of fresh air. Its speed was not just noticeable - it was transformational. Processes like compiling and bundling, which once took significant time, were now happening almost instantly. This improved efficiency fundamentally changed my workflow, making the development process more fluid.

What I loved most about Vite was how easily it integrated with my workflow and how much it improved my productivity. The difference in speed was glaring, and going back to slower tools felt like a step backward. Vite proved to be a game-changer for my project in a world where development cycles are constantly under pressure to be shorter.

Transitioning to PNPM from NPM and Yarn

Isometric graphic of a software development lifecycle with package managers, version control, and programming tools ascending along a growth arrow in yellow and blue tones.
Isometric graphic of a software development lifecycle with package managers, version control, and programming tools ascending along a growth arrow in yellow and blue tones.

I have switched from using NPM to Yarn and now to PNPM. This change was not just out of curiosity but was driven by recognizing the capabilities of PNPM.

What initially impressed me about PNPM was its speed, which has been a recurring theme in my recent tech stack updates. I found PNPM's efficiency almost startling, much like my experience with Vite. Package installation and management, which used to be a routine chore, suddenly became faster and more streamlined.

In my career, I have used NPM in the first half and Yarn in the second half, witnessing the evolution of package management in the JavaScript ecosystem. PNPM stood out not only because of its speed but also because of its familiar command structure. This familiarity made the transition feel less like learning a new tool and more like upgrading to a better version of an old one.

But it wasn't just about comfort; it was about performance. In the fast-paced world of web development, every second saved in package management translates to more time focusing on actual development. Therefore, PNPM has become an integral part of my tech stack.

Exploring SSR for the First Time with RemixJS

I used to have a static website but wanted to try server-side rendering (SSR) with a single-page application (SPA). After learning about RemixJS and its robustness in a React-based ecosystem, I decided to use it.

Initially, I hesitated about SSR, but RemixJS helped me appreciate its benefits. The framework's implementation of SSR was particularly impressive in terms of performance and user experience, especially for sites with rich content.

Choosing RemixJS for my first deep dive into SSR wasn't just about trying a new technology. It represented a significant step in my development practice, where I embraced a more integrated approach, balancing server-side efficiency with a dynamic front-end experience.

In my previous roles, I gained expertise in managing performance and designing attractive user interfaces in a Single Page Application (SPA) environment. This experience made me confident in handling data dynamically and efficiently. However, I faced a new challenge when I switched to using Server-Side Rendering (SSR) with RemixJS. It required a change in mindset, especially regarding how initial data is handled.

With SSR, the approach to data delivery is fundamentally different. Loading initial data is not only a matter of client-side requests but also involves a server-side process that was new territory for me. This shift was not just a technical transition but a conceptual one, requiring me to rethink the strategies I had previously accustomed to in a SPA context. RemixJS, therefore, was not just a tool but a new paradigm for managing data and UI performance.

Transitioning to Tailwind CSS

My journey with Tailwind CSS has been one of gradual understanding and adaptation. Initially, I wasn't a fan. Despite several attempts to engage with it and hearing passionate arguments from its proponents, my stance remained skeptical.

My previous projects used Tailwind, but I was never involved in the initial setup or pattern establishment. This lack of deep involvement contributed to my reservations. When I finally decided to give Tailwind a proper chance, particularly in setting it up from scratch, I was looking for a change in perspective.

One of the first things I realized was that Tailwind didn't significantly reduce the amount of CSS I wrote. The argument that Tailwind eliminates the need to write CSS didn't hold up in practice; I still recall and apply CSS principles regularly. The comparison with my previous experience, where IDEs converted shorthand into full CSS rules, was stark. Tailwind didn't save me from typing; it just changed the syntax.

In addition, even though Tailwind CSS might be good enough for simple user interface requirements, I faced certain restrictions when dealing with more intricate designs, particularly those that involve pseudo-elements that I often utilize. Consequently, I was advised to create custom CSS to address these limitations, which was unexpected.

Having spent most of my career using pre-processed languages like SASS, which have been game-changers regarding organization and composability, I appreciate frameworks that leverage native CSS capabilities. Tailwind presented a mixed bag in this regard - while it encouraged using underlying language features, its API and shortcuts felt less intuitive than other frameworks like Chakra UI.

Porting Angular 12 and GatsbyJS to Remix

I decided to rewrite my website, which was previously built using Angular 12 and GatsbyJS, to Remix. The main reason behind this decision was to learn new frameworks and development approaches. My website features interactive canvas, listing, and article detail pages, providing a practical ground for my exploration.

Isometric digital illustration of a multilayered data center with cloud computing icons, data blocks, and connectivity symbols in a blue color scheme.
Isometric digital illustration of a multilayered data center with cloud computing icons, data blocks, and connectivity symbols in a blue color scheme.

While rewriting the interactive canvas, I had to adopt a more complex approach. Initially, I developed the canvas in Angular and converted the class-based logic to React's functional components without considering the unique requirements of the interactive canvas. Therefore, I isolated the canvas into a class, which enabled the canvas to redraw without causing a re-render and maintaining the same color palette for returning users. This aspect of the rewrite highlighted the importance of understanding framework-specific nuances.

I significantly improved build and compile times by switching to Remix and Vite. While GatsbyJS took about one and a half minutes for a build, Remix took under 30 seconds, with Vite further reducing the initial local compile time.

This project wasn't just about using a new framework. It was a practical experiment in adapting to different web technologies and methodologies.

Moving from Netlify to Vercel

I have been using Netlify for years, both personally and professionally. However, I recently tried Vercel due to the hype around the platform. My experience with Netlify has been primarily positive, with easy deployment and reliability, but I wanted to see what Vercel had to offer.

Vercel and Netlify have similar functionality, including easy rollbacks, simple configuration, and various templates. However, Vercel's user interface and interaction design were slightly better than Netlify's. Remember that this preference is subjective and based on my experience and requirements, which might differ from others.

Switching to Vercel was more about exploring an alternative than being unsatisfied with Netlify. Both platforms offer solid solutions for modern web deployments, but Vercel's approach was more suited to my current project needs.


I rewrote my website using Remix and experimented with various tools such as Vite, PNPM, and Vercel during this process. Each step taught me practical skills and knowledge, from tackling SSR with RemixJS to integrating Tailwind CSS and evaluating different hosting platforms.

This journey involved keeping up with the latest trends and understanding how these technologies could benefit my work. It reinforced the idea that in web development, staying open to new tools and approaches is essential for continuous improvement and keeping pace with the industry's evolution.

Ultimately, this project was as instructive as it was functional, providing insights that could be valuable to others navigating similar paths in web development.

And that new build time… 🐎


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